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20121027
20121104
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improved the lives of americans. you may think about... go to just picking up 20 percent of government or making more or providing efficiency in the government and doing lots of that. there are a lot more things happening across the board that were driving forward. but the important part of this is really thinking about outside of the government. how will we have an impact in the lives of americans in so many profound ways. and it is not only easy to connect the dots between how we are using technology inside government. and how we are fostering a culture of government going forward related to how young women are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and t
into the mfac award and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that fin
. and olds a degree in government and a diploma in public policy from the university of edenburo >> thank you very much >> good evening, everyone, this election we have candidates for state senate district eleven, miss additionally, viewers from the it, brooke man community center will submit questions on-line. the time keepers in the first row, will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates that they have 15 seconds remaining and will hold up a red card when it is time to stop. both candidates have agreed to ask their supporters in the audience to be respectful of the other candidate and others in the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i also ask you respect this commitment. you have many important decisions to make on november 6th. today's forum gives you the opportunity to ask questions to help you make decisions. now let's begin. >> we will start with question number one, miss difficult on. >> retire aoes in the public and private sectors are faced with nrets to benefits from under funded pen son funds what would you do to prevent this from arriving in the future ho
, and is a small business owner here in san francisco. she holds a degree in government, from claire mont college and a policy. >> good evening, everyone, candidates. >> good evening. >> this year we have two candidates for state assembly state 19, michael brior and phil tim. >> they will answer questions that you in the audience submit as well as the questions submitted to the league of women voters. in addition, the viewers from the senior center may submit questions on-line. the time keepers will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates that they have 15 seconds remaining and hold up a red card when it is time to stop. >> both have asked the supporters to be respectful of the candidate and the audience and to maintain the quiet during the forum, i also ask you to respect this commitment, please. >> you all have many important decision to make on november 6th, and today's forum will give you the opportunity to ask questions to help you make your decisions. now, let's begin. >> our first question is a very general... actually i want to start with one here that is from the richmond seni
and becoming more efficient through what i have done through office and to make government much more receptive and efficient. >> that leads into the question about civic engagement. it is critical that people are engaged to have a safe, strong and vibrant state. what have you done and what will you do to encourage the kind of participation that you are talking about. >> i think that transparency and disclosure are some of the main reasons that we have so little citizen participation, that is one of the reasons that i started up we stand san francisco it is an on-line society to engage citizen and order people to get more involved in government so that we cannot just have a conversation here, where people could make it, if people could be part of that conversation on-line, just like all of the folks at the richmond senior sen center, so they can participate. i think that what is lacking in government at times is really making sur that citizens have the information, and they are digestable information and so few people when they pay property taxes one of the biggest checks they write every year
, the san francisco public librariry and our media partner, san francisco government television. and thanks to each of you, for taking the time to inform yourself about your choices on november 6th. good evening. [ applause ] >> jennifer wagner. jnny first joined the league in san francisco in 2001 and has since volunteered in many roles at the local, regional and state and nation levels she currently volunteered as the president of the league of woman voters of california, and is a small business owner here in san francisco. she holds a degree in government, from claire mont college and a policy. >> good evening, everyone, candidates. >> good evening. >> this year we have two candidates for state assembly state 19, michael brior and phil tim. >> they will answer questions that you in the audience submit as well as the questions submitted to the league of women voters. in addition, the viewers from the senior center may submit questions on-line. the time keepers will hold up a yellow card to signify to the candidates that they have 15 seconds remaining and hold up a red card when it is time
sfgtv meeting of the government audit and oversight committee october 29, 2012 will begin shortly. >> all right. we're on. apologies for the difficulties and i want to welcome everyone to the special meeting of the government audit and oversight committee today on monday october 29 here in the city and county of san francisco home of the world series champions giants. i am supervisor mark farrell. i am the chair of the committee and joined by supervisor chiu and will be joined by supervisor elsbernd. i want to thank the staff for covering today's meeting. madam clerk do we have any announcements? >> yes. please make sure to silent any electronic devices and items acted upon today will be on the agenda anyplace otherwise stated. q. can you do item one and two together please? >> item one is a hearing and resolution and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i wa
city government into the business of making home loans. this is part of what brought on the economic crisis at the federal level, fannie mae and freddie mac giving out home loans to people who couldn't afford to buy and later had their houses foreclosed. we don't know what's going to happen in the housing market for the next 30 years. i think it's foolish to set aside increasing set amounts of money for the next 3 decades when we know right now that there's thousands of people living on the streets. why not just build as many affordable units now as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter? >> there's a number of assertions from my opponent that are based in a misunderstand
against it. >> so you both touched on it when you were answering that question, the role of government and what is appropriate and i am curious more of a general question, starting with you mr. leno. what do you think that the government should do and when should the government step aside? >> certainly. >> one of the most important roles of government, and for state government is to provide public safety and i think that goes beyond just the police and fire protection, but also to make sure that we keep our air safe. that we keep our water clean and drinkable, which is not the case in many parts of the state right now. that we make sure that our food is safe as well. and so, that is where regulation does come in. there is also, when you ask where the government should step aside, we work on a bill this past year which reforms the regulations for permitting of solar installations for residents and commercial properties. this impedes the expansion of a great industry that is employing more and more people, that can provide more and more tax benefit to the state. that is where the state s
or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey, and i think it will continue in these hearings and going forward to be one of the challenges. i think we use technology on a daily basis and work and we are engaged and are we getting our money's worth and getting the service we want? and i wanted to revisit and my staff will tell you it's easy to hammer on the things not going well and i want to re-cap of the last five years and whether we're making progress in solving the problems and some of the projects are project related, operationally related and to your point president chiu and look back over the last four cio's and embedded in the organization and we need to talk about those in different conversations and i will be brief and i don't want this to be a marketing campaign, but we have made significant accomplish
as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter? >> there's a number of assertions from my opponent that are based in a misunderstanding how affordable housing works in san francisco in this particular measure. unfortunately there's not enough time to tackle all of them, but i want to make clear this is not subsidizing middle income home owners. this is going to go primarily for low and very low householders in san francisco. that has always been the programmatic focus because you can leverage funding. we live in a high income market and that is exactly why we have an affordable sector in this city. when it comes it recreating redevelopment, that's a fallacy. it's about recognizing t
the technology at home within his city government. the mayor has had hand on's experience as the execute administrative officer and the head of ddw. perhaps that experience has been him in the experience of this and i hope he considers technology an integral part of city operations that needs to and can be improved. that city technology is a significant priority for him and his staff. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can help or it's deja vu all over again. you've had our report. rather than present each finding and recommendation, though each is important, and we stand by them, we believe it is best to highlight just those items we find most significant in terms of organizational structure, the needs for easily accessible information and about hiring. first let's deal with structure the most important component to level as the jury stated clearly in our report we recognize the importance of maintaining the ability to meet unique department needs with unique department solutions, and that should rest within those departments. that already exists. no changes is offered. what is
's start with you, supervisor. thanks for having me. proposition d is a good government measure that will increase voter turnout in our elections for city attorney and treasurer, two very important offices, and will also save the city 4.2 million dollars every 4 years. right now we elect our city attorney and treasurer in a very, very low turnout odd year election where they are the only two offices on the ballot. and turnout is always extremely low in that election. and it costs us over $4 million dollars to hold that election. proposition d would move the city attorney and treasurer elections to be on the same ballot as the mayor, which is a much myer turn jut election, so more people would be voting for city attorney and treasurer and every time we don't hold that very low turnout odd year election separately for city attorney and treasurer, we'll save 4.2 million dollars. prop d was put on the ballot unanimously by the board of supervisors and it's been endorsed overwhelmingly by both the democratic and republican party. >> dr. faulkner, do you think this is a good idea. >>
by the government they don't trust the government and we need less of the head butting and yes the city needs money but we can't do it on the backs of small business and the threats to residents and i completely oppose the meters on sundays and late nights. >> mr. crowley. >> in district seven i think it's necessary to dismiss this idea all together and let's not forget the holidays and they hit them as well. a one size approach doesn't fit this and i suggest the parking lots at the ball field and we do dynamic pricing and that is one solution that is dense and know they're going to pay for parking and looking for solutions to fit their car in for free. only in areas where there is the retail wrap that should happen but in district seven it's a disincentive for the merchants. >> we are good at shooting the goose and in the foot and muni says we have a deficit let's gouge the drivers. are you going to drive anywhere? no. you're going somewhere else and where is that revenue that we need? and by the way give free passes to youth and expand it from there, so we gill the gooses and shoot the drive
of the economy, the consumer, the investment and the government. the only reason thing that has grown on a rapid rate is the government. the government gets their revenues through taxation or borrowing money. the problem is the regulations are hurting small businesses. 2/3 of all jobs are created by small business which are considered -- chapter s corporations and less than $250,000 killing all of the regulations and kill the incentive. the government doesn't produce anything. it's the private sector that produces the wealth and the opportunity. get the government off the back through regulations and taxation and you will see the city once again be vibrant. i'm telling you it's taxation and regulations. i have two successful businesses. i would not open another one in san francisco. i would not. >> thank you. mr. yee. >> here's the four things i would do to create jobs. number one, help the small businesses with a one stot shop approach. ocean avenue had a fire. nine businesses had a fire and the mayor came and if he could do that one time we could do that all the time and number two
government and it's our open government that you the voters have voted for so for four months the board is doing whatever they want to do, and there is no process for a check and balance, and that cannot go on while they make back room deals. they strategize and leave and go to other appointments that they are elected to, so with corruption here at city hall and we must face it. we must deal with it. >> thank you. mr. lagos. >> yes thank you cheryl. the number one issue for me is major land use development and affordable housing. i think they're codependent issues. the reason why i say this is because we have had a policy in the city for the last 40 or 50 years of transforming a lot of the working class, middle class neighborhoods into basically upper middle class, upper class neighborhoods and in my opinion it's destroying our city and there needs to be a stop put to it, and so that's what i see as the major problem here and the major issue which i would tackle if i were elected in november. >> all right thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> yes. i think the most important thing that cou
from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in government understand this one really, really well, how do we pay for it? last time i checked, home land security grants and general fund don't really look fondly on missions to foreign countries because we do have a department of state and a military that does this all the time. so is it really something that's in our purview and what can we use the funding for and that led to the next obvious conclusion in our minds, which was we need a partner. we need a nonprofit partner. and the first thing that popped in our mind was fleet week because we've been working with fleet week for a number of years and the focus has been on humanitarian relief. so we made a phone call and we talked to lewis. and i gotta say, if there's one guy in this room that is the unsung hero of fleet week, it's lewis. he doesn't get a lot of recognition but he spends 16 hours a day this time of year working on fleet week and we went to him (applause) -- when we went to him with this admittedly somewhat crazy idea, we said, we want to partner with
government. it's not sexy, but it's what we need. professionally i'm a cartographer. san francisco department and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has co
it because that is your life. >> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in
the greatest relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one p
housing. the association of bay government says that they need 18,000 new units of housing and we are nowhere close to that. prop c, something that i encourage you to vote for, but let's go back to the ballot in the years to come and pass an affordable housing bond something that san francisco has not done in close to two decades. we need to improve our public schools in san francisco if we are going to be a family and child-friendly city. prop 13 has starved our schools of funding across the state of california and in san francisco for decades. commercial property owners have been on a tax holiday through the reagan and bush era and have received benefits it is time for us to properly tax commercial property owners here in san francisco so that we can make-up for the lack of funding that we receive from the state. i plan to do that by instituting a commercial rent tax in san francisco. san francisco needs to be a culturally sustainable city and environmentally sustainable, restoring uni, uni has had a structural budget deficit. we need supervisors who are going to have the politi
, and i really don't i think it's government over reaching and i really have a problem with that, and if it is illegal then we need to do outreach so that people need to know it again and if they are violating the law well then i am for enforcing the law. >> thank you ma'am. mr. lagos. >> short term rentals is something i know about having lived in mark merced because our landlord rents out them on a nightly or weekly basis and i am oppose to that. i am opposed at the whole idea of renting out short term rentals to people, so i would be opposed to taxation on those units because i am opposed to the whole idea of short term rentals because they deprive people from affordable housing and it's an end around rent control. >> mr. rogers. >> i think that's a good point. i have a frent who has a rental unit down stairs and has an agency that is providing her people that would stay there and they were people that were travelers and they would stay for a month and then she would look for another tenant there and it would be another two months before she got a tenant and stay a month or
in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but we need to do more. let's work with all stakeholders to assure that rules are based on fairness and financial realism for all, not for the personal enrichment of a few. i would rewrite the public flaping rules which are costing the city millions. why should a candidate receive up to 150,000 city tax dollars then spend that money on consultants in walnut creek or in san jose which is being done now? i'm not one of the quarter million dollars candidates but i've raised several thousand dollars, buttons, website, campaign essentials all produced here in san francisco. homelessness and panhandling, when friends visit from out of town they are aghast at the number of people on the streets. some are truly destitute. on the other end of the spectrum, some have homes. compassion, resources and outreach are crucial, but we also need city
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
to read grades. we have been talking about the government and upcoming election. so we will read our book. i love the way i see table one. everybody's eyes are on me. what a great job. "grace for president." one monday mrs. barrington rolled out a big post wer all the presidents on it. grace could not believe her eyes. where are the girls! that's a very good question, says mrs. barrington. the truth is, our country has never had a woman president. no girl president? ever! >> no, i'm afraid not, said mrs. barrington. >> grace sat down at her desk. no girls. whatever heard of such a crazy thing. finally she raised her hand. >> scholars from uc berkeley, we talked about how very special we were. we tell you all the time you are special. the mayor, of all the other schools in san francisco, chose to come. and uc berkeley. so the mayor will talk to you a little while. all of our attention is which way? >> well, good morning everyone. >> good morning. >> i want to first begin by thanking your teacher, ms. mayes, for letting me come and be part of your class room today. of course your principal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 174 (some duplicates have been removed)